Women, Menopause and Alzheimer’s: XX Brain Connections with Lisa Mosconi, Ph.D. – #675

Supporting brain health in the years before midlife and menopause may help ward off Alzheimer’s.

My guest today is a neuroscientist and neuro-nutritionist recognized and respected for her contributions to the fields of brain science, the microbiome, and nutritional genomics.

Dr. Lisa Mosconi is the founder and director of the Women’s Brain Initiative and associate director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York. She’s also an associate professor of neuroscience in neurology and radiology at Weill Cornell and an adjunct faculty member at New York University’s Department of Psychiatry.

Her current scientific work focuses on the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease in at-risk people, particularly women. More than a decade of research has shown two things, Dr. Mosconi says: “No. 1, Alzheimer’s Disease is not a disease of old age, but rather the disease starts with negative changes in the brain years—if not decades—before any clinical symptoms emerge. So, we’re looking at midlife, rather than when you’re 70 or 80. No. 2, women tend to develop these negative changes in their brains before men do, and specifically as women go through menopause. That was a big finding.”

“Menopause symptoms don’t start in the ovaries,” she says, “they start in the brain.” That’s why Dr. Mosconi uses brain imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as seen in the example below.

She is passionately interested in how risk of memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease can be mitigated, if not prevented, through the combination of appropriate medical care and lifestyle modifications involving diet, nutrition, physical and intellectual fitness. She details this in her new book, “The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Dr. Mosconi’s research into women’s neurological health is changing the way science approaches the female brain.

Enjoy the show! … And get more resources at Dave.Asprey/podcasts.

Listen on Apple Podcasts or iTunesListen on Google Podcasts

Follow Along with the Transcript

Women, Menopause and Alzheimer’s- XX Brain Connections with Lisa Mosconi, Ph.D. – #675

Links/Resources

Website: lisamosconi.com
Facebooklisamosconiphd
Twitterdr_mosconi
Instagramdr_mosconi
Tumbler : brainfoodblog.tumblr.com
“The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease”
“Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power”

Key Notes

  • How Lisa started looking into Alzheimer’s Disease –  04:12
  • Alzheimer’s disease affects more woman than men –  06:12
  • The role that hormones play during menopause that affect the brain – 11:37
  • What are the simple lifestyle changes that women can do to reduce Alzheimer’s risk? – 19:57
  • How the right lifestyle can be beneficial over time – 26:00
  • What should women do? – 29:12
  • If you are dealing with severe symptoms – 33:20
  • There is an education component that is missing – 36:45
  • What are the most likely blood work tests that can tell you what to do? – 39:30
  • What are 3 steps you can take to reduce your risk? – 41:00
  • Brain scans and what they can tell you – 49:30

Go check out my new book Super Human: The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever and also “Game Changers“, “Headstrong” and “The Bulletproof Diet” on Amazon and consider leaving a review!

If you like today’s episode, check us out on Apple Podcasts at Bulletproof.com/apple and leave us a 5-star rating and a creative review.

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