Is Your Laptop Giving You Weak Sperm?

Exposure to laptop computers might adversely affect male fertility by inducing DNA fragmentation and decreasing progressive motility, according to research presented here at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine 66th Annual Meeting.

via Laptop Exposure Associated With Nonthermal Effect on Sperm Quality.

This is scary stuff. Ever since starting the research for The Better Baby Book (and so I could have kids with the best genes I could give them), I’ve been aware of the effects of EMF on human health.

Some people – most notably cell phone manufacturers – stick to the idea that EMFs are only a problem to the extent they heat tissues to cause “thermal effects.” The medical advisers to the anti-aging nonprofit I run, Smart Life Forum, believe otherwise. So does Robert Becker in “Electromagnetism and Life.” And now the above study shows that using a laptop while sitting on your lap can fry your “swimmers.”

Who wants to be a Bulletproof Executive if you don’t have Bulletproof…um…nevermind.

Here’s what I do to keep my body and mind as resilient as I know how to make them:

  • Don’t use my laptop (a Macbook Pro) on my lap, or if I must, I use it on battery power and without Wifi enabled to reduce EMF.
  • I wired my house with ethernet. It’s way faster and has no EMF effects.
  • I use a lamp remote switch to turn off my Wifi router when not using it, which is most of the time
  • I use a new kind of household electrical filter that creates less chaotic EMF (Find them on here on UpgradedSelf.com)
  • More recently, I’ve been sleeping using an Earthing mat and felt a noticeable difference.

In any case, the evidence is now very clear that needlessly bathing yourself in excess EMFs isn’t a good idea. Wifi is useful but it is wise to use it judiciously. Tim Ferriss completed a similar experiment that resulted in him increasing his sperm quality by moving his mobile phone away from his hip pocket.

You may also like

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest

Statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information provided by this website or this company is not a substitute for individual medical advice. Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.